Home Message likes Theme
1 2 3 4 5 Next →

explorationimages:

Gaofen-1: “Farms along the beach of an estuary”, part of an image release from China’s new earth resources satellite.

explorationimages:

Gaofen-1:  “Farms along the beach of an estuary”, part of an image release from China’s new earth resources satellite.

spaceexp:

Tears of Ithaca by Tim Barton

spaceexp:

Tears of Ithaca by Tim Barton

spaceexp:

Russia’s Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft, carrying the ISS crew of European Space Agency’s German astronaut Alexander Gerst, Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev and NASA astronaut Gregory Wiseman, blasts off from the launch pad at Baikonur Cosmodrome, May 29, 2014 Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev

spaceexp:

Russia’s Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft, carrying the ISS crew of European Space Agency’s German astronaut Alexander Gerst, Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev and NASA astronaut Gregory Wiseman, blasts off from the launch pad at Baikonur Cosmodrome, May 29, 2014  Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev

gravitationalbeauty:

A Roll Cloud Over Missouri

(Source: elledrivers)


astronomicalwonders:

The Jellyfish Nebula - IC 443

"The Jellyfish Nebula is a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) in the constellation Gemini. On the plan of the sky, it is located near the star Eta Geminorum. Its distance is roughly 5,000 light years from Earth.

IC 443 may be the remains of a supernova that occurred 3,000 - 30,000 years ago. The same supernova event likely created the neutron star CXOU J061705.3+222127, the collapsed remnant of the stellar core. IC 443 is one of the best-studied cases of supernova remnants interacting with surrounding molecular clouds.”

Credit: NASA/ESA/Wikipedia

astronomicalwonders:

The Jellyfish Nebula - IC 443
"The Jellyfish Nebula is a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) in the constellation Gemini. On the plan of the sky, it is located near the star Eta Geminorum. Its distance is roughly 5,000 light years from Earth.
IC 443 may be the remains of a supernova that occurred 3,000 - 30,000 years ago. The same supernova event likely created the neutron star CXOU J061705.3+222127, the collapsed remnant of the stellar core. IC 443 is one of the best-studied cases of supernova remnants interacting with surrounding molecular clouds.”
Credit: NASA/ESA/Wikipedia

spaceexp:

Jupiter and Io

spaceexp:

Florida as seen from the ISS

spaceexp:

Florida as seen from the ISS

astronomicalwonders:

Reflections in the Orion Nebula - M78

This image of the reflection nebula Messier 78 was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This colour picture was created from many monochrome exposures taken through blue, yellow/green and red filters, supplemented by exposures through a filter that isolates light from glowing hydrogen gas.

Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

Reflections in the Orion Nebula - M78
This image of the reflection nebula Messier 78 was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This colour picture was created from many monochrome exposures taken through blue, yellow/green and red filters, supplemented by exposures through a filter that isolates light from glowing hydrogen gas. 
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

The Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula

This panoramic view combines a new image of the field around the Wolf–Rayet star WR 22 in the Carina Nebula with an earlier picture of the region around the unique star Eta Carinae in the heart of the nebula. The picture was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Credit: ESO/La Silla

astronomicalwonders:

The Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula
This panoramic view combines a new image of the field around the Wolf–Rayet star WR 22 in the Carina Nebula with an earlier picture of the region around the unique star Eta Carinae in the heart of the nebula. The picture was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.
Credit: ESO/La Silla

gravitationalbeauty:

Ringside

canadian-space-agency:

Spectacular aurora taking place behind Canadian clouds. September 12 2014.

Photo Credit: Glengarry Fencibles

canadian-space-agency:

Spectacular aurora taking place behind Canadian clouds. September 12 2014.
Photo Credit: Glengarry Fencibles

sci-universe:

These both are images of the comet 67P/C-G (which will soon be the 1st comet to be landed on): one is the view from a ground-based telescope (VLT) and the other a close-up taken with the European Space Agency’s Rosetta probe navigation camera.

Rosetta is the mission which took a 10-year journey to its destination to unlock the mysteries of the oldest building blocks of our Solar System.

Credit & copyright: C. Snodgrass/ESO/ESA, MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA


afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).

Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!

To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

(Source: spacetelescope.org)

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).
Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.
From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!
To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

explorationimages:

Apollo 16: Far-ultraviolet image of the Earth, taken with a small telescope on the lunar surface.

AS16-123-19650 (21 April 1972) —- A far ultraviolet photograph reveals the geocorona, a halo of low density hydrogen which surrounds Earth. The photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, during the first spacewalk of his trip to the moon. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, explored the moon’s surface while Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. The UV camera was designed and built at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.
explorationimages:

Apollo 16:  Far-ultraviolet image of the Earth, taken with a small telescope on the lunar surface.

AS16-123-19650 (21 April 1972) —- A far ultraviolet photograph reveals the geocorona, a halo of low density hydrogen which surrounds Earth. The photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, during the first spacewalk of his trip to the moon. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, explored the moon’s surface while Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. The UV camera was designed and built at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.